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  • Establishing a Business Entity in Estonia (Updated)

    1. Types of business entities - 
 
 The most common types of companies in Estonia are the public limited liability company ("AS") and the private limited liability company ("OÜ"). The OÜ may be compared to a closed corporation: its shares are not publicly traded and there are usually rather few shareholders. The shares of an AS, in contrast, are always in book-entry form and more easily transferable.
 
 The main reason most businesses opt for the OÜ form is that the minimum share capital requirement is EUR 2,500 (does not have to be paid upon registration by an individual person), whereas for the AS it is EUR 25,000. In addition, OÜ form has more simple management structure (one level with sole management board member) and it does not have automatic auditing obligation.
 
 Please see full Chapter below for more information.

  • Work, Residence And Business Travel In Estonia After Brexit For UK Nationals
  • Estonia Enacts New Reforms to Its Parental Leave and Benefit System to Better Reconcile Work and Family Life

    The latest phase of legislative changes to Estonia’s Family Benefits Act are due to come into effect in July 2020.
 
 Legislative changes to the Family Benefits Act were approved in 2017, but the changes have been introduced gradually.

  • Establishing a Business Entity in Estonia (Updated)

    1. Types of business entities -
 
 The most common types of companies in Estonia are the public limited liability company ("AS") and the private limited liability company ("OÜ"). The OÜ may be compared to a closed corporation: its shares are not publicly traded and there are usually rather few shareholders. The shares of an AS, in contrast, are always in book-entry form and more easily transferable. 
 
 The main reason most businesses opt for the OÜ form is that the minimum share capital requirement is EUR 2,500 (does not have to be paid upon registration by an individual person), whereas for the AS it is EUR 25,000. In addition, OÜ form has more simple management structure (one level with sole management board member) and it does not have automatic auditing obligation.
 
 Please see full Chapter below for more information.

  • GDPR Guide to National Implementation: Estonia - A practical guide to national GDPR compliance requirements across the EEA

    Q1/ Applicable legislation -
 
 (a) Have the requirements of the GDPR been addressed by introducing a new law, or by updating existing legislation?
 
 Old legislation has been updated in addition to new legislation being passed.
 
 ———
 
 (b) Relevant legislation includes:
 
 Personal Data Protection Act (the “PDPA”)
 Date in force: 15 January 2019...

  • Looking for a GILTI-Free Structure? Try Estonia

    Estonia, the small Baltic country of just 1.3 million people situated halfway between Sweden and Russia, was named “the most advanced digital society in the world” by Wired magazine. According to recent figures, Estonian residents complete their taxes online in under five minutes, 99 percent of Estonia’s public services are available on the internet 24 hours a day, and nearly one-third of its citizens vote via the internet.

  • Establishing A Business Entity In Estonia

    1. Types of business entities -
 
 The most common types of companies in Estonia are the public limited liability company ("AS") and the private limited liability company ("OÜ"). The OÜ may be compared to a closed corporation: its shares are not publicly traded and there are usually rather few shareholders. The shares of an AS, in contrast, are always in book-entry form and more easily transferable.
 
 The main reason most businesses opt for the OÜ form is that the minimum share capital requirement is EUR 2,500 (does not have to be paid upon registration by an individual person), whereas for the AS it is EUR 25,000. In addition, OÜ form has more simple management structure (one level with sole management board member) and it does not have automatic auditing obligation...
 
 Please see full Chapter below for more information.

  • Dance Dance Dance in Denmark with the Ghosts of Money Laundering Past

    As early as 2007 the Russian Central Bank warned Danske about suspicious activity. In the same year the Estonian banking regulator warned the bank about suspicious transactions. In 2009 an internal whistleblower alerted the corporate office of shenanigans in the Estonian branch.

  • Danske Bank CEO Resigns on Heels of Report Detailing an Astounding $234 Billion in Suspicious Transactions in Money Laundering Scandal

    This week Danske Bank released a report detailing the results of its much anticipated internal investigation into allegations of money laundering perpetrated in its Estonian branch.

  • Estonia Makes It 13 For The UPC